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Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - animal - 11-25-2017

I found this to be a great read. It reminds me why I use Firefox and what Mozilla has done and doing. I wish there were more organizations like this.

*edit*
I forgot the link lol
https://amosbbatto.wordpress.com/2017/11/21/mozilla-market-share/


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - Xulb - 11-25-2017

Great article Animal. I try to use Firefox as much as I can. Chrome will slurp your entire life into Google's insatiable maw.
X


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - animal - 11-25-2017

I use Firefox since v2.0 and never looked backed. I used Chromium in linux a couple of times to play some .io games and thats all. I try to convince people to use FF over anything most, but just like the article says, people don't care and are unaware of how evil some companies can get.


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - [SiN]bAnfire - 11-25-2017

Using google chrome makes one a product. Using explorer makes one dumb.
Choose...


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - Xulb - 11-26-2017

Big Grin
(11-25-2017, 07:46 PM)[SiN]bAnfire Wrote: Using google chrome makes one a product. Using explorer makes one dumb.
Choose...



RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - DeathRay - 11-26-2017

I use FF, but find that it has become a massive memory hog, and burns up quite a bit of CPU at times.  It seems like it's performance has deteriorated horribly as of late.  I'm looking for alternatives at this point.


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - chessplayer - 11-27-2017

(11-26-2017, 11:51 AM)DeathRay Wrote: I use FF, but find that it has become a massive memory hog, and burns up quite a bit of CPU at times.  It seems like it's performance has deteriorated horribly as of late.  I'm looking for alternatives at this point.

In my experience it's the opposite, for me the performance is getting better, but I'm on Linux, don't know how the performance on Windows is.


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - xenos - 11-30-2017

https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2017/11/14/introducing-firefox-quantum/


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - DeathRay - 11-30-2017

(11-30-2017, 07:48 PM)xenos Wrote: https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2017/11/14/introducing-firefox-quantum/

Running it now, I have to say it does seem much faster and less resource intensive.


RE: Nice Article about Firefox and Mozilla - Max - 12-01-2017

So the thing about Firefox Quantum is that breaks compatibility with the rich legacy of addons that people have been creating for over a decade. I always used firefox because it was the most customizable browser, because the addons were allowed to be extremely invasive with the internals of the browser. Faster, more efficient, and even more secure browsers have come along, but I stuck with Firefox because I loved the extreme customization.

Although Firefox Quantum may be faster at moderate levels of tabs, at the scale I use my browser (roughly 3K tabs currently,) pre-Quantum Firefox with a tab suspending addon is actually faster than Firefox Quantum would be. It's impossible to implement a tab suspending addon for Firefox Quantum because the new WebExtensions addon API doesn't allow that level of control over browser internals.

One of the cited reasons for WebExtensions is that it protects users from malicious addons, but IMO there's no good reason for a savvy user to treat addons as untrusted. XUL addons are no more dangerous than installing native software in your OS, and people still do that. All you have to do is vet the addons carefully before you install them, just like any other software.

Now, the vast majority of web users don't need or benefit from that much customizability, and they'd rather have the performance, stability, and security benefits of a rendering engine overhaul. I think it's right for Mozilla to chase that market. However, people like me are a niche too. Firefox has lost what made it special to me, and therefore I no longer have any interest in using it.

Luckily, pre-quantum Firefox has been forked as Basilisk. If it's right for Firefox Quantum to exist, then it is equally right to fork the last XUL-based Firefox, because that has a right to exist too. I was able to plop my Firefox profile directly into the Basilisk config directory, monkey around with about:config a bit, and have everything Just Work. (The Basilisk developers don't recommend this, but I made it work anyway with some manual tinkering.)

At some stage I may try to make my own damn browser. I'd use an existing rendering engine (probably Mozilla's new Servo engine, because that seems to be the hottest and fastest thing around at the moment.) But I'd take a very different approach with the browser's GUI and other features. Inspired by the suckless philosophy of software design, I would create a browser with zero customization features at all. Everything about it would be hardcoded and require a recompile to change. However, it would have a really clean and well-factored codebase which is easy to change, just as easy as finding the right about:config keys or chasing down the right addons. I think that might be the way to achieve the dream of ultimate customization that I've always wanted.